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When it comes to being healthy, many people focus on healthy eating and exercise. Most would forget about their mental health. Learning how to nurture and care for yourself is just as important as maintaining a healthy weight. Self-love is regard for one’s own well-being and happiness (chiefly described as a desirable rather than narcissistic characteristic).

Knowing your value and how you perceive yourself translates into your love-life, the image you project at work, and how you cope with life’s adversities.

Let’s face it, talking about self-love is easy, but taking action is hard. To escape the hellbent of what we have known as society, here’s a guide to practice self-love for beginners.

Be Mindful

People who practice self-love know that you have to be mindful of what you think, feel, and want. People who are mindful act on this acknowledgment.

Nurture Yourself

If you’re in dire need of a relaxing massage, then go get one. Society makes us feel trapped and bad about wanting to spoil ourselves. It makes sense of why we feel the way we do; no one ever taught us about self-love. Believe me, life can be stressful and it can affect your mental health. So do yourself a favor and go spoil yourself. By taking time to do things you love, you will value yourself more.

Live Intentionally

We all want to find our purpose in life, and some of us are still seeking. If your intention is to become happier, then you’ll find activities that make you happy. You see, finding your life’s purpose doesn’t have to be so clear-cut.

Forgive…Yourself

Even when we give our 100%, we are never fully satisfied and end up criticizing yourself. Remember, that we are not robots, we’re not perfect (even if we try to). Realize that it is okay to make mistakes and that you’re not alone. You learn and grow from your mistakes.

Set boundaries

There’s nothing wrong with saying yes, but you have to learn to say no. You can’t be exerting all of your energy on one thing or one person, then you won’t have enough energy for yourself.

References
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us

stephanie